Sunday, March 27, 2011

Creeping Islam in the US

A Tulsa, Okla., police captain is suing his chief and the city after he was demoted and targeted by an internal investigation for refusing orders to attend an event featuring lessons in Islam, a tour and a prayer service at a mosque linked to an unindicted co-conspirator in a terror financing trial.
The legal action has been brought by attorneys with the Thomas More Law Center on behalf of Paul Fields.
Named as defendants are the city, police chief Charles W. Jordan and deputy chief Alvin Daryl Webster. WND requests for comment did not generate a response from the defendants.
The lawsuit focuses on the officer’s constitutional and civil rights, and besides a resolution of Fields’ concerns, it seeks an injunction preventing “enforcement of defendants’ unconstitutional acts, policies, practices, procedures and/or customs.”
At issue is a solicitation by officials in the Tulsa Police Department for officers to attend a “Law Enforcement Appreciation Day” organized by the Islamic Society of Tulsa. The invitation said the officers would be given tours of the mosque, meet the mosque’s leadership, be given presentations of “beliefs, human rights, women” and “watch the 2-2:45 weekly congregational prayer service.”
While at first the police administration’s recommendation for attendance at the event appeared to be voluntary – there was a voluntary signup list – the law firm said when officers refused to respond, the managers made it a required event.
The day “had nothing to do with any official police function. It clearly fell outside of the police department’s policy on community policing, and based on comments made by police department officials in a closed door meeting, it was not ‘community outreach’ as it has been previously portrayed,” the law firm explained.
“Rather, it included a mosque tour, meetings with local Muslims and Muslim leadership, observing a ‘weekly prayer service,’ and lectures on Islamic ‘beliefs,’” the Thomas More Law Center explained. “The event was scheduled for Friday, March 4, 20011 – Friday being the ‘holy day’ or ‘Sabbath’ for Islam. In fact, the event was originally voluntary, but when not enough officers were willing to attend, it became mandatory.”
The lawsuit alleges, “The event held by the Islamic Society involved Islamic proselytizing. The Islamic Society event was advertised as including Islamic proselytizing, and it in fact resulted in the proselytizing of city police officers who attended the event.”

According to the new Tulsa lawsuit, images of some police officers appeared later in a publicity photograph used by the mosque to promote “Islam classes for Non-Muslims.”
The Thomas More Law Center, which already is involved in other litigation defending the religious freedom of Christians as well as “countering the infiltration of radical Muslims in America,” said it was working with Tulsa attorney Scott Wood to defend Fields’ “constitutional right not to become a propaganda prop for the local mosque".


Safoorah Khan, 29, was hired to teach middle-school math in November 2007. According to her lawyer, she was happy in her job, which included preparing sixth, seventh, and eighth graders for state tests, and running the “math lab.” After nine months on the job, Khan requested a three-week leave of absence in order to perform the hajj — the pilgrimage to Mecca that all Muslims are obliged to undertake at least once in their lives if they can afford it.
Employers are required by law to honor requests for religious accommodations provided that they do not impose “undue hardship” on the employer or other employees. Berkeley officials maintained that a three-week absence in December — which would have denied the school its only math-lab instructor right before exams — was unreasonable and not covered by the teachers’-union contract. They denied her request. Khan decided to make the trip anyway and submitted her resignation.
She also submitted a letter of complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, charging that the school board’s refusal to grant the 19-day leave amounted to religious discrimination. “They put her in a position where she had to choose,” her lawyer, Kamran A. Memon, told the Post, and this revealed “anti-Muslim hostility.”
The town’s former mayor disagreed. “The school district just wanted a teacher in the room for those three weeks,” said Michael A. Esposito. “They didn’t care if she was a Martian, a Muslim, or a Catholic.”
Now the Justice Department has taken up her case. Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Thomas Perez explains that he took the case in part to combat “a real headwind of intolerance against Muslim communities” and that Khan’s lawsuit seeks to ratify the “religious liberty that our forefathers came to this country for.” Perez has spoken before of his belief, shared by Attorney General Eric Holder, that “our Muslim-American brothers and sisters” have been the “victims of a post-9/11 backlash.”
Now we see how Perez and Holder can assert that Muslim Americans are suffering a “backlash.” If they can see religious discrimination in Khan’s case, it’s no wonder they see it under every mattress.
Reality check: Many first-year employees get no vacation days or time off. Teachers, depending upon their union-negotiated contracts, may get some. But to suggest that refusing a three-week leave at a crucial time of the school year is “discrimination” is just perverse. It’s reaching to find a base motive for an obviously sensible decision.
Ms. Khan’s departure to fulfill a religious obligation that she has a lifetime to satisfy left her students bereft at a critical time. Doesn’t Islam also forbid breaking a contract or leaving children in the lurch? Besides, Khan is 29. The next scheduled hajj that will fall during a school vacation will be in eight years. Ms. Khan will, God willing, be fully capable of making the trip then. But why accommodate your students and your employer when you can sue?
The selfishness of Khan’s behavior was so blatant that even the Washington Post was moved to look for other motives in the Justice Department’s decision. “The Obama administration has gone to great lengths to maintain good relations with Muslims — while endorsing tough anti-terrorism tactics.”
This is the same month in which the Obama administration admitted that it won’t be closing Guantanamo after all. And President Obama has deployed unmanned aerial vehicles pretty aggressively over Afghanistan and Pakistan. Is this a way to placate Muslim Americans who may be unhappy about the War on Terror?
It may be. Or it may just be another example of the reflex to genuflect before all claims of discrimination — no matter how baseless. The U.S. government is asking for back pay, reinstatement, and money damages for Safoorah Khan. When you elect a liberal Democrat to the White House, this is what you get.

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